Talk With Me Notes

Early Language Services

Notes

Posted: December 17, 2018

All parents look forward to their child's firsts: first steps, first full night of sleep and, of course, their first words.

As with all stages of child development, there is a range during which children develop their skills. So, if your child is not doing everything at every stage, it is not necessarily cause for concern.

However, a wait-and-see approach is not necessarily the best either, especially when early intervention can make a difference.

As a speech-language pathologist with the Talk With Me program, I often tell parents that a child’s language development can be compared to climbing a set of stairs, with a child at the bottom and moving up one step at a time.

Babies start reacting to sound right at birth. At around four to six months, they will start cooing or "talking," followed by babbling at around six to 12 months. You will usually hear your baby’s first words around his or her first birthday.

As your child continues up the steps, you should be seeing him or her using around 50 single words by 18 months. By 24 months, children start to use two-word phrases, such as "Ahdah mama" ("Alldone mama") or "Wawa peas" ("Water please").

The words and sounds of a two-year-old are not necessarily spoken clearly, but that is normal. From two to three years of age, you should be seeing a rapid change in speech and language development, with an increasing vocabulary and use of language. At this stage, you should be wondering, "Where did our child even learn certain words?"

By three years of age, you should understand your child’s speech 75 per cent of the time, and they should be telling you short stories and using three- and four-word phrases ("I goed to the pawk (park)," "Her is awdone (alldone) now"). Their speech may not be completely perfect yet, but that is still OK.

From four to five years of age, children are gaining more and more words, ideas and concepts, and should be able to express themselves with longer and longer sentences in a smooth, clear way.  They are talking like mini adults now.

They should understand your questions and directions and their speech should be understood almost all the time by an unfamiliar listener. That is a lot of stairs, in a short time.

Here are a few tips to help your child’s speech and language development:

1) Limit screen time according to the Canadian Pediatric Society’s recommendations. That means no screen time (TV/tablet/phone) for children under two years of age and limited screen time (less than one hour per day) for children between two to five years of age.

We don’t talk much when we look at a screen and the same goes for your child. This is a tough one in this day and age, but children learn how to communicate through active play and engagement with the people and things in their world.

2) Provide lots of verbal input to your child. Talk to them all the time about what you’re doing, what they’re doing, what you’re seeing, hearing, and where you’re going. Talk throughout your day. Talk to them in the language you are most comfortable.

When you talk to your child, wait for them to do or say something in response. Mealtime, bath time, playtime, driving, walking and shopping are all opportunities for your child to learn words.

3) Use books right from birth with your child. Use them to snuggle up and enjoy some time together. Aim to read at least one book every day. Use the library. Don’t feel you have to read the entire book. Look at the pictures and name the items on the page. Even if your child is only interested in one page, that is still a great start and a great way to learn words and ideas.

If at any point your child’s speech and language seems to be "stuck" on a stair, or moves down a stair (regresses), or you have concerns, it is likely time to talk to a professional.

The Speech-Language Pathologists at Talk With Me are ready to answer your questions and can meet with you and your child for a consultation if requested.  If you have concerns about your child's communication skills, don't wait and see, call Talk With Me at 1-888-623-6363.

We look forward to working with you and your child to help them take the next "step."

 

Posted: September 19, 2018

1 cup water

1 tablespoon vegetable oil

1/2 cup salt

1 tablespoon cream of tartar

food colouring-assorted

saucepan

1 cup flour

 

Method:

1. Combine water, oil ,salt, cream of tartar, food colouring in saucepan over medium to low heat.

2. Remove from heat and add flour.

3. Stir then knead until smooth.

* To make Pumpkin Spice Playdough simply add 2 teaspoons of pumpkin pie spice and orange food colouring only!

Note: Cream of tartar will make the playdough last for six months

Always store playdough in airtight containers with lids.

Posted: September 12, 2018

A parent recently asked about ways to help her child learn prepositions.  Laura Mize, Speech-Language Pathologist from "Teach Me to Talk" gives excellent advice on this topic:   

Toddlers first begin to understand prepositions in the context of familiar directions and then say prepositions as single words before they include prepositions in phrases. This last skill occurs by 30 to 33 months. Prepositions to be targeted include: in, out, off, on, up, down, here, and there. Other sources also list under, by, and around by 3.

Remember, a child must first understand these words before she says them. Here's some information for making sure she's on track with understanding new prepositions/location phrases

Toddlers with typically developing language understand the following prepositions by age 3: in, out, off, on, up, down, here, there, under, by, and around. Lists vary by source.

As in the previous developmental period, teach these words during context while playing using objects to demonstrate the concept. With typically developing children these words are often learned in pairs as “opposites” such as in vs. out, off vs. on, and up vs. down. However, it may be necessary to teach one concept at a time to a child with significant delays to avoid confusion.

Using a favorite character for the child to manipulate is a very effective way to teach prepositions. If a child loves her Elmo doll, use Elmo to teach location words in silly and unexpected situations. Hide Elmo under  the pillow. Make Elmo run around  the train track. By introducing more creative teaching methods, you’re ensuring that a child pays attention, wants to participate, and increases the likelihood that she’ll remember the new concept and word. You’re also encouraging her to be flexible when she plays and to generalize the word beyond one specific context.   

One fun way to target prepositions is to use the child himself to model each concept. Place him in a laundry basket and then take him out. Climb on  the couch, and then jump off. The playground is an ideal place to teach prepositions. Go up  the ladder and then down  the slide.

While you might label and point out examples of prepositions/location words while reading books or using pictures, please don’t rely on this as your primary method of teaching this important word category. At some point, a child’s comprehension might be assessed using pictures, so be sure a child recognizes these concepts in pictures after he masters locations words with real objects.

If you have any questions or concerns, about your child's speech-language development, or would like more suggestions on ways to help expand your child's vocabulary and language skills, call Talk With Me at 623-6363.

 

 

Posted: July 27, 2018

The Speech-Language Pathologists at Talk With Me (ASD-N) have recently completed a 3-day workshop in Moncton to become certified trainers of Learning Language & Loving It - The Hanen Program® for Early Childhood Educators/Teachers (LLLI). The program is for educators who wish to receive coaching and specific communication and interaction strategies they can immediately incorporate in their daily routines and activities with the children they teach. 


Here is a comment from an educator in Toronto who attended the LLLI Program:

"I have learned so much about language and communication development in young children through the Learning Language and Loving It™ Program. The changes I have made in my style of interaction and communication with the children have resulted in changes in the children that are quite evident”

 A review of the research for the program attached to this note.  

Please contact us if you would like more information about the LLLI program, or if you would like to know when it will be offered in your region! 

The Healthy Child Network in Restigouche is proud to host a summer event called the Super Summer Spectacular next Friday August 3rd in Dalhousie at the Lions Club Playground from 10am to 12pm!  Click on the attached summer event ad poster for more information!

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Posted: July 5, 2018

Talk With Me ASDN is promoting a new contest over the summer months.  Find one of the "Talk With Me Rock" hidden throughout the district and post a picture of it either one of our Facebook pages (Talk With Me - Miramichi/Kent, Talk With Me Bathurst/Chaleur, or Talk With Me - Restigouche) and/or post your picture on your personal Facebook/Instragram using the #TalkWithMeRocks.  Contest closes on September 7, 2018 and a winner of a family game night basket will be drawn.  There will be one winner in each of the following areas: Miramichi/Kent, Bathurst/Chaleur, and Restigouche.  If you are unable to find one of our Talk With Me Rocks, you may also enter the contest by posting a picture of a rock that you decorated yourself following the same directions above.  We also encourage you to "like and share" our facebook pages.

Finding rocks has become a very popular activity for all ages.  There are many ways you can build your child's language skills during these activities, while having fun with your child doing so. While looking for painted rocks with your child, talk about the places you are looking (e.g., I see a rock under the picnic table, Here's a rock beside the beside).  This is a great way to learn about prepositions.  When you find a rock, talk about the colors used and the picture painted on it.  If there is writing on the rock, point out the letters and discuss the sound the letter makes.  Be creative when painting your own rocks with your child.  Talk about what you are going to paint and what supplies are needed for your project.  Talk about the steps you need to follow to prepare your own rock (e.g., First we find a rock.  Then we paint the rock  We let the paint dry and then seal the rock.  Last, we hide our rock).  Have fun and happy hunting!!  

 

Talk With Me facebook links:

Talk With Me - Miramichi/Kent  https://www.facebook.com/Talk-With-Me-Miramichi-Kent-222000167828504/

Talk With Me - Bathurst/Chaleur  https://www.facebook.com/TalkwithMeBathurstChaleur/

Talk With Me - Restigouche  https://www.facebook.com/Talk-with-Me-Restigouche-647900905261489/

 

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Here is the Summer calendar for Talk With Me in Restigouche, which covers July - August 2018.  Please check the Talk With Me - Restigouche Facebook page for any updates and cancellations regarding programming!

Posted: June 14, 2018

Touch provided through gentle massage has proven to offer a multitude of benefits for both parent & baby. Some of the integral benefits can be: relaxation, bonding, attachment, brain development as well as gas/colic relief.  More importantly, as parents sing and interact face-to-face with their babies, they are promoting early language and communication skills.

Therefore, Infant Massage enhances the growth & development of the infant; both emotionally, physically, and cognitively!

Posted: June 1, 2018

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Posted: May 15, 2018

Even if a child eventually begins to talk and make full sentences, there is a price to pay for late speech and language development.

Trouble with speaking can mean problems in all areas of language development.

This can mean trouble in school with listening, reading, spelling and even math.

Children who can’t communicate well get frustrated.

Intervention works best before the age of 3.

All children can benefit from more speech and language stimulation.

Strong pre-school language skills are the single best predictor of success in school.  

 

If you have questions or concerns about your child's speech and language development, 

Don't Wait and See, call Talk With Me 1-888-623-6363.

Here is the Spring calendar for Talk With Me in Restigouche, which covers April - June 2018.  Please check the Talk With Me - Restigouche Facebook page for any updates and cancellations regarding programming.